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How to plant, grow and care for Calathea

How to plant, grow and care for Calathea

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Asked  4 months ago
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I do not have a large garden space. Is Calathea a suitable choice for an indoor plant? If so, how should we plant, grow and grow for a Clathea plant?

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For people who do not own large garden spaces, have the privilege of digging into a backyard, or live in tiny apartments, the idea of indoor planting seems appealing and tickles their gardening skills. It lets their inner gardener enthusiast and hobbyist stay alive; because gardening provides oxygen for your body and soul!

Indoor gardening has gained immense fame, especially when we are all locked down amidst a pandemic and we are running out of ideas to keep ourselves busy and our minds sane. Because the houseplants not only enhances the beauty of your environment but halve a relaxing and calming effect on the people around them.

Wait, hang on.

You cannot just jump on the bandwagon of indoor gardening just because you "feel like it." You first need to obtain the right knowledge with all the dos and don'ts regarding houseplants, so you don't go wrong with them. As they say, knowledge is a garden, and if you do not cultivate it right, there will be nothing to harvest!

What is a suitable indoor plant adding beauty to living rooms or office desks?

People often find themselves in a nook when they decide what indoor plants to choose because the conditions are not the same as the outdoors. Certain things have to be kept in mind.

Image for question

Calathea, belonging to the flowering family of Marantaceae, is an ornamental plant and has become popular as a houseplant, especially for decorative purposes. The most important thing while choosing an indoor plant is how easy they are to care for; Calathea steals the game here, as they are very easy to plant, grow and care for.

Calathea plant blooms amazingly in low light, hence all the more reason to get it as your houseplant. Their wide, oblong, bright green leaves with an array of gorgeous colors make them a treat for the eye and the soul. Call Calathea a cathedral plant, peacock plant, zebra plant, prayer plant, or a rattlesnake plant; its attractive stripes and veining appearance justifies all the nicknames.

Calathea is often preferred to be kept as an indoor office plant as it is aesthetically pleasing and reduces the tension in the stressful aura at work!

How should you plant, care and grow the Calathea plant?

When you invest in the plants with money and hard work, they pay the fruitful interest for a lifetime.

Calathea is a non-fussy, hassle-free, non-complaining plant. Plant them in any container or pot, and place them in any suitable location; they will adjust themselves! A Calathea plant loves a shady environment with moisture-filled air and mild temperatures. As Calathea care is easy does not mean that you can take them for granted or get careless, it will hurt them.

So when you plan on having your indoor plant partner, you better learn how to look after them.

Keep scrolling to know your Calathea better!

Let us plant and grow the Calathea in a better and much easier way;

Light or no light, let Calathea decide.

Image for question

Coming from a tropical origin, it may seem that a Calathea plant may need a lot of sunlight to thrive. Well, it is not valid. As they are used to growing under canopy trees hence, they adapt to low or indirect light that makes Calathea care easy as an indoor plant. You need to save them from direct sunlight as it can burn the beautiful leaves, causing them to lose the eye-pleasing colors. A Calathea plant also owns the nyctinasty movement, making the leaves move throughout the day and fold during the night as par the sun's position, maximizing light absorbancy.

Hence, provide a shady environment or indirect light, and they are suitable to grow!

Water is the ultimate source of life but within limits.

A Calathea plant loves water, but just the right amount. The best way to prevent the plant from drying out or to prevent under-watering is the ultimate "rule of thumb," you insert your finger or the thumb in the soil, and if it is wet, then there is no need to water it, and vice versa. Calathea enjoys moist soil, not a soggy one. Another point to remember is that Calathea is pretty much water-conscious, and the tap water might not suit this plant, causing the leaves to turn yellow. Therefore they can be slightly more demanding in this regard than the other houseplants.

Thus, it is better to use distilled, purified, or rainwater to promote healthy growth. And if the only source you have is the tap water, worry not, let it sit overnight and use it the next day on the Calathea plant so that any substances like chlorine can evaporate. Water the Calathea once in a week or two, more in the summers and less in winters!

Soil, let it embrace the plant.

A soil that retains water for long periods is the best choice; a potting mixture that is airy and lightweight works well, ensuring good Calathea care. The soil should be preferably acidic, but the pH of 6.3 to 6.5 is good enough.

Always choose a planting pot with drainage holes at the base to prevent the soil from getting waterlogged, which might lead to root rot. Hence, soil aeration is mandatory to let the excess water evaporate. If the water stands on the top of the soil, it is not suitable for the plant as it can cause the leaves' yellowing.

Image for question

Temperature and humidity; keep a check on the indoor atmosphere!

Calathea does not like the cold; that being said, keep the plant at a place that provides it with a balmy temperature of about 75 degrees Farrenheit to 85 degrees Fahrenheit. But as previously mentioned, a Calathea plant is non-fussy. Therefore it can bear slight temperature drops, but not below 60 degrees. If the leaves start to curl, you need to check the temperature because there is something wrong with it, causing damage to the plant.

Calathea thoroughly enjoys a moisture-packed environment indicating high humidity. Drop-in humidity can ruin the beautiful bright green leaves. Thus, find a spot indoors with a naturally high humid level or get yourself a good humidifier.

Fertilizer is the key to healthy growth!

The soil needs its food too, just as you do!

Calathea does not need a lot of fertilizer; once in a month is good enough, especially during the growing and flowering time in spring, summer, and fall. Taper it off during the winter season as growth is really slow during the cold weather.

If the plant is not growing, you should stop fertilizing as it does not need it.

Pruning, remove the dead from the plant.

As hassle-free as it is, a Calathea plant does not need much pruning. You need to remove the yellow or brown leave if you see any!

Clean the leaves every now and then with a damp cloth to keep the dust away that may compromise the Calathea plant's beauty.

As of now, you would know better than Calathea care is not much of a task when it is done right

Although some varieties of Clathea such as "white fusion" are very demanding plants often labeled as "drama queens." Still, apart from them, many are low maintenance, easy to grow, incredibly tolerant plants that overlooks a little carelessness from your side and still continues to thrive.

Few problems and their solutions with the Calathea Plant:

  • If there is a lack of humidity, the leaves' tips will start to turn brown, and it may sometimes indicate that you are not using the right water for them. Either way, it needs your immediate attention to put the wrong right!
  • You need to be careful with the soil because if waterlogged, fungus gnats (little insects like fruit flies) will make the Calathea plant their home. They might not be dangerous to the plants, but having them indoors anywhere near you or the plant... even the thought irks me. To avoid this, always ensure soil aeration or keep the upper half-inch of soil dry. You could also mix some diatomaceous earth with the top part of the soil.
  • If the plants start to wilt or curl, they are not getting enough water. Hence, grab your water bucket or a mister and get the job done.
  • A black base or yellowing leaves indicates overwatering. It would be best if you let the soil dry out a little before you water next time, keeping the levels low this time.

NOW THAT YOU KNOW, IT IS TIME TO GROW!

Even if you are a beginner or a new hobbyist who has endured on the journey of gardening, the Calathea plant should be on your list of indoor planting because they are just a treat to have around.

What are you waiting for? You can start planting today because, with the right Calathea care, there can be no gardening mistakes, only experiments.

  • add comment
  • 0
avatar

Things To Note When Planting Different Varieties Of Calathea

These tropical plants are native to Brazil, and within the genus of Calathea are some of the most eye-catching plants with interesting names. Some of the interesting common names (which indicate a little about the plant’s appearance) are peacock plant, zebra plant, and rattlesnakes plant.

Grown as houseplants in most climates, calathea are characterized by bold markings and dazzling colors on oblong leaves. The tropical Hawaiian climate allows calathea to be grown as an outdoor ornamental plant.

While there are many similarities between the genus calathea, there are also certain things to note when planting different varieties. As tropicals, all varieties dislike chilly temperatures but will thrive in a warm, humid environment in any part of the world. Read to discover differences within the Prayer Plant’s family and you may discover a new favorite houseplant.

Calathea Ornata

Image for question

Also known as the Pinstripe Calathea has large green leaves with small pink stripes. The leaves will mature to around 2-inches long and equally as wide. The plant will grow to a mature height and width of around 2-feet.

Calathea Ornata loves to be grown in moist, but not soggy, soil. Plant in a potting soil that is formulated to retain water without becoming water logged. Use the double-pot planting method to provide enough soil moisture without drowning the plant.

To double-pot, plant the Calathea Ornata in a plastic nursery pot with plenty of bottom drainage holes. Then place that plastic pot inside a decorative pot that is slightly larger. This will allow excess water to drain through the soil quickly while increasing the humidity around the plant as the excess water remains in the second pot.

Calathea Orbifolia

Image for question

This attractive variety of calathea is also known as the South American Prayer Plant and is prized for its large, eye-catching leaves. The over-sized leaves can reach up to 1-foot across and equally as long. They are oval-shaped and have unique silver stripes.

Calathea Orbifloia is a rare variety and can be hard to find. When you do find one and bring it home, give the plant a jungle-like environment with plenty of warmth and humidity and it will thrive.

Calathea Medallion

Image for question

Aptly named for its large ‘medallion’ shaped leaves, Calathea Medallion has stunning leaves that appear to be painted with shades of deep green and fuchsia. The colorful leaves also grow upright and shine as though they were polished.

This is one of the most popular choices within the Prayer Plant family but it can also be one of the fussiest. To keep the leaves growing upright and retain their shiny quality, you will have to give the plant plenty of attention.

Keep the plant in a bright location away from direct sunlight, keep it warm, and keep the soil moist at all times. Calathea Medallion will need to be fed twice a month during spring and summer.

Calathea White Fusion

Image for question

This Calathea variety has variegated leaves in shades of white, green, and lilac. The top side of the plant leaves have contrasting white markings alongside the green, and the underside of the leaves have a light lilac hue that continues down the stems.

The colorful leaves of Calathea White Fusion will need to be wiped down monthly with a soft, damp cloth to remove dust. This will promote good air intake for the plant and keep the white leaves from looking dingy.

This variety of Calathea enjoys a spot in the mourning sun but keep it away from the afternoon sun.

Calathea Musaica

Image for question

This tropical houseplant is slightly less showy than other members of the Prayer Plant family. But it’s also a little easier to care for. Calathea Musaica leaves have subtle dark green markings on them that give the leaves the appearance of a sheet of musical notes.

The plant needs the same tropical-like environment as it’s Calathea cousins but is not as demanding as long as you keep the plant away from drafts and keep the soil moist.

Calathea Makoyana

Image for question

Also known as the Peacock Plant and Cathedral Plant, Calathea Makoyana is a tall, slender plant that will reach a mature height of 2-feet. The plant leaves are pale green with dark green markings that give a feather-like appearance that radiates from the middle of the leaf to the outer edges.

New leaves appear on the Calathea Makoyana all rolled up with their pinkish-red underside showing. The colorful leaves will slowly unroll to reveal the top side with the pale and dark green markings.

This Calathea variety needs to be placed in a low light growing location to prevent the vibrant leaf color from fading and turning dull.

Calathea Lancifolia

Image for question

Called the Rattlesnake Plant (Rattlesnake Calathea) because of its elongated leaves and distinct color pattern on the top side of the leaves. The wavy leaves are striped with alternating big and small ovals of dark green and accented by a purple underside.

Calathea Lancifolia is a compact and bushy plant that will be around 1-foot tall and equally as wide when mature. This one makes a great tabletop houseplant for any bright indoor location.

Calathea Roseopicta

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The Rose Painted Calathea is an undemanding houseplant and it one of the easiest within the Calathea genus to care for. The striking coloration on the top side of the leaves looks as though it was painted onto the leaves. The upright growing habit of the leaves reveals a purple underside that enhances the light green and dark green pattern on top.

Place Calathea Rosepicta in a bright, warm location, and keep the soil moist. Feed the plant every other week from spring through summer and repot it into a slightly larger pot every other year.

Calathea Zebrina

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The Zebra Calathea is known for its striped leaves in a zebra-like pattern. The large leaves hang downward and sometimes curl slightly back towards the plant stem so the purple underside of the leaves is not always visible.

Calathea Zebrina grows tall, up to 3-feet, and will produce tiny white or purple flowers when the plant is grown outside. This Calathea prefers a warm and shady growing location that mimics its natural environment as an understory plant in a tropical rain forest.

Calathea Freddie

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Called a Freddie Plant for short, is hardy and will bounce back after becoming dehydrated. Calathea Freddie is adaptable to most any light conditions except direct sunlight. This houseplant has a compact and bushy growing habit with oval leave that have a velvety two-toned green pattern on top. The plant will reach a mature height of 2-feet tall and can spread out to be 2-feet wide.

Calathea Warscewiczii

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Also known as Calathea Jungle Velvet because of the deep green velvety leaves and native jungle habitat. Calathea Warscewiczii is a perennial evergreen that is originally from Central and South America.

The leaves of this stunning plant are large, hang downward, and have a light and dark green top pattern that resembles a fishtail. This is a large houseplant that can reach a mature height of 4-feet and equally as wide.

Keep the plant in a bright location but out of direct sunlight. Keep soil moist and mist the plant daily to increase humidity.

Feed plant once a month from spring through summer and only re-pot when the plant becomes root bound.

Calathea Beauty Star

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This plant has all the standard leaf colors - green, pink, white, and silver with deep purple undersides. That’s one of the reasons it’s named Beauty Star. The elegantly shaped leaves are longer and thinner than other Calathea varieties.

Calathea Beauty start is a bushy plant that will reach a mature height of 2-feet and be about 2-feet wide. Place in a bright location where the air temperature will remain close to 75 degrees F and keep the soil moist at all times.

Calathea Triostar

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Tri-colored beauty with long, narrow leaves in shades of green, pink, and white. Display the Calathea Triostar in a semi-bright location away from direct sunlight. Direct sunlight will burn the plant leaves and if the room is too bright the leaf colors will become dull.

Turn this plant a quarter turn once a week to keep the leaf colors bright and even on each side of the plant. This member of the Prayer Plant family prefers the air temperature to be a little cooler and will thrive in a location where the temperature remains around 65 degrees F. Calathea Triostar is cold hardy and can withstand temperatures that dip down to 40 degrees F.

Calathea Vittata

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As the long oval leaves of the Calathea Vittata open each morning, the coloration of the leaves is a sight to behold. The striking white bands of color on the dark green leaves look handpainted and surreal.

The plant will reach a mature size of 2-feet tall and equally as wide. Place in a bright location away from direct sunlight and keep soil moist. Wipe leaves down with a damp soft cloth monthly to prevent a build-up of dust that will cause the white color of the leaves to turn dull and impeded the air intake of the plant.

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LIGHTA Calathea plant likes bright indirect light; so placing it in front of an east, west, or north window is ideal. Too much direct sun burns the leaves and causes the beautiful leaf colors to fade.WATERCalatheas are very sensitive to the water you use. Hard water, soft water, fluoridated water, or water of poor quality causes the leaves to turn brown from leaf burn. The best way to water is to use distilled water, rain water, or allow your tap water to sit out over night before using it. Keep the soil moist but never soggy. Allow the top 2-3” to dry out before watering. Never let a Calathea Plant sit in water.FERTILIZERFeed monthly in the spring, summer, and fall with a balanced plant food diluted to ½ the recommended strength. Don't fertilize if the plant is not growing.TEMPERATURECalatheas like temperatures between 65°-80°F (18.3°-26.7°C), and do not like cold drafts or temperatures below 55°-60°F (12.8°-15.6°C). Hot temperatures cause the leaves to curl.HUMIDITYHigh humidity is a must! A Calathea plant gets brown leaf edges when the air is too dry. Humidity can be increased by placing your plant on a tray of wet pebbles (be sure the pot is on the pebbles and not in the water), setting a humidifier close by, or by grouping plants together to create a greenhouse effect.FLOWERINGThe leaves of a Calathea are more beautiful than many of the flowers on other indoor plants. With over 300 varieties of Calathea, some types such as Calathea Crocata, White Ice, and Brazilian have lovely flowers as well as spectacular leaves.PESTSSpider Mites, scale, Mealy Bugs and Aphids are houseplant pests that can be a problem.DISEASESThe high humidity that a Calathea plant needs also encourages bacterial and fungal diseases which usually manifest themselves as leaf lesions.SOILUse a good light porous indoor potting soil that retains water but still drains quickly. African Violet soil works well.POT SIZEA Calathea rarely needs repotting.PRUNINGCut off brown or crispy Calathea leaves as soon as they appear.PROPAGATIONCalatheas plants are propagated by plant division but it is a little difficult.POISONOUS PLANT INFOCalatheas are non- Poisonous Houseplants.

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How to plant, grow and care for Calathea

How to plant, grow and care for Calathea

bounty icon
$50
Multiple winner share bounty
Asked  4 months ago
Viewed  0 times

I do not have a large garden space. Is Calathea a suitable choice for an indoor plant? If so, how should we plant, grow and grow for a Clathea plant?

  • add comment
avatar

For people who do not own large garden spaces, have the privilege of digging into a backyard, or live in tiny apartments, the idea of indoor planting seems appealing and tickles their gardening skills. It lets their inner gardener enthusiast and hobbyist stay alive; because gardening provides oxygen for your body and soul!

Indoor gardening has gained immense fame, especially when we are all locked down amidst a pandemic and we are running out of ideas to keep ourselves busy and our minds sane. Because the houseplants not only enhances the beauty of your environment but halve a relaxing and calming effect on the people around them.

Wait, hang on.

You cannot just jump on the bandwagon of indoor gardening just because you "feel like it." You first need to obtain the right knowledge with all the dos and don'ts regarding houseplants, so you don't go wrong with them. As they say, knowledge is a garden, and if you do not cultivate it right, there will be nothing to harvest!

What is a suitable indoor plant adding beauty to living rooms or office desks?

People often find themselves in a nook when they decide what indoor plants to choose because the conditions are not the same as the outdoors. Certain things have to be kept in mind.

Image for question

Calathea, belonging to the flowering family of Marantaceae, is an ornamental plant and has become popular as a houseplant, especially for decorative purposes. The most important thing while choosing an indoor plant is how easy they are to care for; Calathea steals the game here, as they are very easy to plant, grow and care for.

Calathea plant blooms amazingly in low light, hence all the more reason to get it as your houseplant. Their wide, oblong, bright green leaves with an array of gorgeous colors make them a treat for the eye and the soul. Call Calathea a cathedral plant, peacock plant, zebra plant, prayer plant, or a rattlesnake plant; its attractive stripes and veining appearance justifies all the nicknames.

Calathea is often preferred to be kept as an indoor office plant as it is aesthetically pleasing and reduces the tension in the stressful aura at work!

How should you plant, care and grow the Calathea plant?

When you invest in the plants with money and hard work, they pay the fruitful interest for a lifetime.

Calathea is a non-fussy, hassle-free, non-complaining plant. Plant them in any container or pot, and place them in any suitable location; they will adjust themselves! A Calathea plant loves a shady environment with moisture-filled air and mild temperatures. As Calathea care is easy does not mean that you can take them for granted or get careless, it will hurt them.

So when you plan on having your indoor plant partner, you better learn how to look after them.

Keep scrolling to know your Calathea better!

Let us plant and grow the Calathea in a better and much easier way;

Light or no light, let Calathea decide.

Image for question

Coming from a tropical origin, it may seem that a Calathea plant may need a lot of sunlight to thrive. Well, it is not valid. As they are used to growing under canopy trees hence, they adapt to low or indirect light that makes Calathea care easy as an indoor plant. You need to save them from direct sunlight as it can burn the beautiful leaves, causing them to lose the eye-pleasing colors. A Calathea plant also owns the nyctinasty movement, making the leaves move throughout the day and fold during the night as par the sun's position, maximizing light absorbancy.

Hence, provide a shady environment or indirect light, and they are suitable to grow!

Water is the ultimate source of life but within limits.

A Calathea plant loves water, but just the right amount. The best way to prevent the plant from drying out or to prevent under-watering is the ultimate "rule of thumb," you insert your finger or the thumb in the soil, and if it is wet, then there is no need to water it, and vice versa. Calathea enjoys moist soil, not a soggy one. Another point to remember is that Calathea is pretty much water-conscious, and the tap water might not suit this plant, causing the leaves to turn yellow. Therefore they can be slightly more demanding in this regard than the other houseplants.

Thus, it is better to use distilled, purified, or rainwater to promote healthy growth. And if the only source you have is the tap water, worry not, let it sit overnight and use it the next day on the Calathea plant so that any substances like chlorine can evaporate. Water the Calathea once in a week or two, more in the summers and less in winters!

Soil, let it embrace the plant.

A soil that retains water for long periods is the best choice; a potting mixture that is airy and lightweight works well, ensuring good Calathea care. The soil should be preferably acidic, but the pH of 6.3 to 6.5 is good enough.

Always choose a planting pot with drainage holes at the base to prevent the soil from getting waterlogged, which might lead to root rot. Hence, soil aeration is mandatory to let the excess water evaporate. If the water stands on the top of the soil, it is not suitable for the plant as it can cause the leaves' yellowing.

Image for question

Temperature and humidity; keep a check on the indoor atmosphere!

Calathea does not like the cold; that being said, keep the plant at a place that provides it with a balmy temperature of about 75 degrees Farrenheit to 85 degrees Fahrenheit. But as previously mentioned, a Calathea plant is non-fussy. Therefore it can bear slight temperature drops, but not below 60 degrees. If the leaves start to curl, you need to check the temperature because there is something wrong with it, causing damage to the plant.

Calathea thoroughly enjoys a moisture-packed environment indicating high humidity. Drop-in humidity can ruin the beautiful bright green leaves. Thus, find a spot indoors with a naturally high humid level or get yourself a good humidifier.

Fertilizer is the key to healthy growth!

The soil needs its food too, just as you do!

Calathea does not need a lot of fertilizer; once in a month is good enough, especially during the growing and flowering time in spring, summer, and fall. Taper it off during the winter season as growth is really slow during the cold weather.

If the plant is not growing, you should stop fertilizing as it does not need it.

Pruning, remove the dead from the plant.

As hassle-free as it is, a Calathea plant does not need much pruning. You need to remove the yellow or brown leave if you see any!

Clean the leaves every now and then with a damp cloth to keep the dust away that may compromise the Calathea plant's beauty.

As of now, you would know better than Calathea care is not much of a task when it is done right

Although some varieties of Clathea such as "white fusion" are very demanding plants often labeled as "drama queens." Still, apart from them, many are low maintenance, easy to grow, incredibly tolerant plants that overlooks a little carelessness from your side and still continues to thrive.

Few problems and their solutions with the Calathea Plant:

  • If there is a lack of humidity, the leaves' tips will start to turn brown, and it may sometimes indicate that you are not using the right water for them. Either way, it needs your immediate attention to put the wrong right!
  • You need to be careful with the soil because if waterlogged, fungus gnats (little insects like fruit flies) will make the Calathea plant their home. They might not be dangerous to the plants, but having them indoors anywhere near you or the plant... even the thought irks me. To avoid this, always ensure soil aeration or keep the upper half-inch of soil dry. You could also mix some diatomaceous earth with the top part of the soil.
  • If the plants start to wilt or curl, they are not getting enough water. Hence, grab your water bucket or a mister and get the job done.
  • A black base or yellowing leaves indicates overwatering. It would be best if you let the soil dry out a little before you water next time, keeping the levels low this time.

NOW THAT YOU KNOW, IT IS TIME TO GROW!

Even if you are a beginner or a new hobbyist who has endured on the journey of gardening, the Calathea plant should be on your list of indoor planting because they are just a treat to have around.

What are you waiting for? You can start planting today because, with the right Calathea care, there can be no gardening mistakes, only experiments.

  • add comment
  • 0
avatar

Things To Note When Planting Different Varieties Of Calathea

These tropical plants are native to Brazil, and within the genus of Calathea are some of the most eye-catching plants with interesting names. Some of the interesting common names (which indicate a little about the plant’s appearance) are peacock plant, zebra plant, and rattlesnakes plant.

Grown as houseplants in most climates, calathea are characterized by bold markings and dazzling colors on oblong leaves. The tropical Hawaiian climate allows calathea to be grown as an outdoor ornamental plant.

While there are many similarities between the genus calathea, there are also certain things to note when planting different varieties. As tropicals, all varieties dislike chilly temperatures but will thrive in a warm, humid environment in any part of the world. Read to discover differences within the Prayer Plant’s family and you may discover a new favorite houseplant.

Calathea Ornata

Image for question

Also known as the Pinstripe Calathea has large green leaves with small pink stripes. The leaves will mature to around 2-inches long and equally as wide. The plant will grow to a mature height and width of around 2-feet.

Calathea Ornata loves to be grown in moist, but not soggy, soil. Plant in a potting soil that is formulated to retain water without becoming water logged. Use the double-pot planting method to provide enough soil moisture without drowning the plant.

To double-pot, plant the Calathea Ornata in a plastic nursery pot with plenty of bottom drainage holes. Then place that plastic pot inside a decorative pot that is slightly larger. This will allow excess water to drain through the soil quickly while increasing the humidity around the plant as the excess water remains in the second pot.

Calathea Orbifolia

Image for question

This attractive variety of calathea is also known as the South American Prayer Plant and is prized for its large, eye-catching leaves. The over-sized leaves can reach up to 1-foot across and equally as long. They are oval-shaped and have unique silver stripes.

Calathea Orbifloia is a rare variety and can be hard to find. When you do find one and bring it home, give the plant a jungle-like environment with plenty of warmth and humidity and it will thrive.

Calathea Medallion

Image for question

Aptly named for its large ‘medallion’ shaped leaves, Calathea Medallion has stunning leaves that appear to be painted with shades of deep green and fuchsia. The colorful leaves also grow upright and shine as though they were polished.

This is one of the most popular choices within the Prayer Plant family but it can also be one of the fussiest. To keep the leaves growing upright and retain their shiny quality, you will have to give the plant plenty of attention.

Keep the plant in a bright location away from direct sunlight, keep it warm, and keep the soil moist at all times. Calathea Medallion will need to be fed twice a month during spring and summer.

Calathea White Fusion

Image for question

This Calathea variety has variegated leaves in shades of white, green, and lilac. The top side of the plant leaves have contrasting white markings alongside the green, and the underside of the leaves have a light lilac hue that continues down the stems.

The colorful leaves of Calathea White Fusion will need to be wiped down monthly with a soft, damp cloth to remove dust. This will promote good air intake for the plant and keep the white leaves from looking dingy.

This variety of Calathea enjoys a spot in the mourning sun but keep it away from the afternoon sun.

Calathea Musaica

Image for question

This tropical houseplant is slightly less showy than other members of the Prayer Plant family. But it’s also a little easier to care for. Calathea Musaica leaves have subtle dark green markings on them that give the leaves the appearance of a sheet of musical notes.

The plant needs the same tropical-like environment as it’s Calathea cousins but is not as demanding as long as you keep the plant away from drafts and keep the soil moist.

Calathea Makoyana

Image for question

Also known as the Peacock Plant and Cathedral Plant, Calathea Makoyana is a tall, slender plant that will reach a mature height of 2-feet. The plant leaves are pale green with dark green markings that give a feather-like appearance that radiates from the middle of the leaf to the outer edges.

New leaves appear on the Calathea Makoyana all rolled up with their pinkish-red underside showing. The colorful leaves will slowly unroll to reveal the top side with the pale and dark green markings.

This Calathea variety needs to be placed in a low light growing location to prevent the vibrant leaf color from fading and turning dull.

Calathea Lancifolia

Image for question

Called the Rattlesnake Plant (Rattlesnake Calathea) because of its elongated leaves and distinct color pattern on the top side of the leaves. The wavy leaves are striped with alternating big and small ovals of dark green and accented by a purple underside.

Calathea Lancifolia is a compact and bushy plant that will be around 1-foot tall and equally as wide when mature. This one makes a great tabletop houseplant for any bright indoor location.

Calathea Roseopicta

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The Rose Painted Calathea is an undemanding houseplant and it one of the easiest within the Calathea genus to care for. The striking coloration on the top side of the leaves looks as though it was painted onto the leaves. The upright growing habit of the leaves reveals a purple underside that enhances the light green and dark green pattern on top.

Place Calathea Rosepicta in a bright, warm location, and keep the soil moist. Feed the plant every other week from spring through summer and repot it into a slightly larger pot every other year.

Calathea Zebrina

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The Zebra Calathea is known for its striped leaves in a zebra-like pattern. The large leaves hang downward and sometimes curl slightly back towards the plant stem so the purple underside of the leaves is not always visible.

Calathea Zebrina grows tall, up to 3-feet, and will produce tiny white or purple flowers when the plant is grown outside. This Calathea prefers a warm and shady growing location that mimics its natural environment as an understory plant in a tropical rain forest.

Calathea Freddie

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Called a Freddie Plant for short, is hardy and will bounce back after becoming dehydrated. Calathea Freddie is adaptable to most any light conditions except direct sunlight. This houseplant has a compact and bushy growing habit with oval leave that have a velvety two-toned green pattern on top. The plant will reach a mature height of 2-feet tall and can spread out to be 2-feet wide.

Calathea Warscewiczii

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Also known as Calathea Jungle Velvet because of the deep green velvety leaves and native jungle habitat. Calathea Warscewiczii is a perennial evergreen that is originally from Central and South America.

The leaves of this stunning plant are large, hang downward, and have a light and dark green top pattern that resembles a fishtail. This is a large houseplant that can reach a mature height of 4-feet and equally as wide.

Keep the plant in a bright location but out of direct sunlight. Keep soil moist and mist the plant daily to increase humidity.

Feed plant once a month from spring through summer and only re-pot when the plant becomes root bound.

Calathea Beauty Star

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This plant has all the standard leaf colors - green, pink, white, and silver with deep purple undersides. That’s one of the reasons it’s named Beauty Star. The elegantly shaped leaves are longer and thinner than other Calathea varieties.

Calathea Beauty start is a bushy plant that will reach a mature height of 2-feet and be about 2-feet wide. Place in a bright location where the air temperature will remain close to 75 degrees F and keep the soil moist at all times.

Calathea Triostar

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Tri-colored beauty with long, narrow leaves in shades of green, pink, and white. Display the Calathea Triostar in a semi-bright location away from direct sunlight. Direct sunlight will burn the plant leaves and if the room is too bright the leaf colors will become dull.

Turn this plant a quarter turn once a week to keep the leaf colors bright and even on each side of the plant. This member of the Prayer Plant family prefers the air temperature to be a little cooler and will thrive in a location where the temperature remains around 65 degrees F. Calathea Triostar is cold hardy and can withstand temperatures that dip down to 40 degrees F.

Calathea Vittata

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As the long oval leaves of the Calathea Vittata open each morning, the coloration of the leaves is a sight to behold. The striking white bands of color on the dark green leaves look handpainted and surreal.

The plant will reach a mature size of 2-feet tall and equally as wide. Place in a bright location away from direct sunlight and keep soil moist. Wipe leaves down with a damp soft cloth monthly to prevent a build-up of dust that will cause the white color of the leaves to turn dull and impeded the air intake of the plant.

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LIGHTA Calathea plant likes bright indirect light; so placing it in front of an east, west, or north window is ideal. Too much direct sun burns the leaves and causes the beautiful leaf colors to fade.WATERCalatheas are very sensitive to the water you use. Hard water, soft water, fluoridated water, or water of poor quality causes the leaves to turn brown from leaf burn. The best way to water is to use distilled water, rain water, or allow your tap water to sit out over night before using it. Keep the soil moist but never soggy. Allow the top 2-3” to dry out before watering. Never let a Calathea Plant sit in water.FERTILIZERFeed monthly in the spring, summer, and fall with a balanced plant food diluted to ½ the recommended strength. Don't fertilize if the plant is not growing.TEMPERATURECalatheas like temperatures between 65°-80°F (18.3°-26.7°C), and do not like cold drafts or temperatures below 55°-60°F (12.8°-15.6°C). Hot temperatures cause the leaves to curl.HUMIDITYHigh humidity is a must! A Calathea plant gets brown leaf edges when the air is too dry. Humidity can be increased by placing your plant on a tray of wet pebbles (be sure the pot is on the pebbles and not in the water), setting a humidifier close by, or by grouping plants together to create a greenhouse effect.FLOWERINGThe leaves of a Calathea are more beautiful than many of the flowers on other indoor plants. With over 300 varieties of Calathea, some types such as Calathea Crocata, White Ice, and Brazilian have lovely flowers as well as spectacular leaves.PESTSSpider Mites, scale, Mealy Bugs and Aphids are houseplant pests that can be a problem.DISEASESThe high humidity that a Calathea plant needs also encourages bacterial and fungal diseases which usually manifest themselves as leaf lesions.SOILUse a good light porous indoor potting soil that retains water but still drains quickly. African Violet soil works well.POT SIZEA Calathea rarely needs repotting.PRUNINGCut off brown or crispy Calathea leaves as soon as they appear.PROPAGATIONCalatheas plants are propagated by plant division but it is a little difficult.POISONOUS PLANT INFOCalatheas are non- Poisonous Houseplants.

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