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Should I wear sunscreen in winter?

Should I wear sunscreen in winter?

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Asked  7 months ago
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I got sunburns on our last college vacations which have become better with daily sunscreen application. As winters are here, and mostly cloudy days, can I just skip my daily sunscreen?

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One thing I would like to make clear is that you simply need to wear SPF all day, every day—even in the winter. So what if there’s less sun, you shouldn’t care and your skin will thank you for it later. It's easy to remember wearing your sunscreen with reminders like bright sunshine and the intense summer heat but while the sun does not feel as strong in the winter, it is a big mistake to neglect sunscreen during this period.

Sunscreen should be an essential part of your routine, regardless of the weather or time of year. No matter how busy you are, you can’t afford to skip sunscreen in the morning. The sun’s harmful rays can cause numerous skin problems such as sunburn, dark spots, early signs of aging, and even skin cancer.

When it's cold and gray the skin still receives the same damaging beams that it does in the summer. Due to the colder weather, people are much more protected under layers of clothes, so the exposure is generally lower, but UV rays are still completely present and still have the potential to affect any exposed skin.

While you're definitely not going to get a sun burn in the middle of winter while seated indoors, UV rays and sunshine still reach through the windows and will perpetuate premature aging and hyperpigmentation. Even if you're working in an office all day long, you're not supposed to skip sunscreen. This is particularly important if you're sitting by a window or driving to work. The same goes for glass windows of any sort whether you’re on an aircraft, bus or any other vehicle.

Despite the way the sky looks, you can still be affected by the sun’s harmful UV rays, No matter how dense the clouds appear in this weather, up to 80% of the sun's rays can easily filter through them

UVA rays are powerful all year round, so your skin needs protection every day of the year. Even a small dose of sunlight can have a damaging effect on your skin.

Winter is the season where you should want to work harder to prevent dry skin and wrinkles, so put on that sunscreen, and use it to keep your skin radiant. This weather is extremely dry and taxing on the skin. Luckily, sunscreen has proven anti-ageing properties.

You're likely to sweat off your sunscreen on a humid day at the beach and need to reapply. What most people don't know, though, is that the harsh winter temperatures make the sunscreen erode much faster. UV radiation rises by 5% per 1,000 feet above sea level. This means that the higher your altitude, the greater your vulnerability to harmful UV rays. Plus, the snow reflects and intensifies the sunlight, rendering you especially susceptible to burns. If you're looking to spend time in the mountains skiing, snowboarding, or cabin-dwelling this season, make sure to always cover yourself with at least 30 SPF of sunscreen.

Snow and strong winds strip away sunscreen and reduce its effectiveness, so in winter, you can't just apply in the morning and say that you're safe all day. Instead, it is recommended that you reapply every two hours during the winter, and immediately after sweating.

Traditionally, most people often believe that they only need sunscreen to shield themselves from sunburn, so we sometimes equate it with visits to the beach or being by the pool, but it's time to shift this narrative and realize that sunscreen is not only about protecting from those days spent in the sun, but even these regular moments can add up to a lifetime of sun damage.

Sun Protection Factor

Sunscreens are labeled with either SPF or Sun Protection Factor. The SPF functions like a multiplier. If you feel that you do ok in the sun for 10 minutes without getting a sun burn for example if you apply a SPF 10 sunscreen, you'll be protected from the sun for 100 minutes. However, in order for the sunscreen to work, you have to apply a lot and it has to stay on. You should use it about half an hour before you head out in the sun (or water) so that it can stick to your skin.

Damage done by the sun to your skin cells lasts forever. Yeah, lasers can remove superficial damage, but the damage to your DNA cannot be reversed. There's a reason why numerous makeup items contain SPF—it’s essential to wear them all year round.

Moisturizers, BB creams, concealers and foundations now all come with SPF-containing varieties that will make this healthy habit simpler. Since wearing sunscreen will deter the ageing process by almost 24 per cent, it's a smart idea to get this ingredient as abundant as possible in your skincare and makeup routines.

However, if the UV rays do end up making their way to you, hydration is one of the best cures for sunburn swelling. As any burn, sunburn causes a loss of moisture in the infected tissue which can require a few water or moisturizer applications to return the skin to its natural state. Creams or aloe vera gels can help to moisturize the skin and minimize swelling. You should also soak a few cotton balls in witch hazel and softly rub them over your skin to cool it off. Try putting cold, wet tea bags on top of the burn to remove the sting of the sunburn. Be vigilant not to burst any blisters, if you feel serious discomfort and swelling, seek medical attention.

SPF’s should never be an option, but a priority to be worn daily for all skin types. Especially, in the winter to scale back those risks, it’s vital to apply (and reapply) sunscreen as part of your daily skin-care routine.

It’s better to be safe than sorry.

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Should I wear sunscreen in winter?

Should I wear sunscreen in winter?

bounty icon
$50
Single winner
Asked  7 months ago
Viewed  0 times

I got sunburns on our last college vacations which have become better with daily sunscreen application. As winters are here, and mostly cloudy days, can I just skip my daily sunscreen?

  • add comment
avatar

One thing I would like to make clear is that you simply need to wear SPF all day, every day—even in the winter. So what if there’s less sun, you shouldn’t care and your skin will thank you for it later. It's easy to remember wearing your sunscreen with reminders like bright sunshine and the intense summer heat but while the sun does not feel as strong in the winter, it is a big mistake to neglect sunscreen during this period.

Sunscreen should be an essential part of your routine, regardless of the weather or time of year. No matter how busy you are, you can’t afford to skip sunscreen in the morning. The sun’s harmful rays can cause numerous skin problems such as sunburn, dark spots, early signs of aging, and even skin cancer.

When it's cold and gray the skin still receives the same damaging beams that it does in the summer. Due to the colder weather, people are much more protected under layers of clothes, so the exposure is generally lower, but UV rays are still completely present and still have the potential to affect any exposed skin.

While you're definitely not going to get a sun burn in the middle of winter while seated indoors, UV rays and sunshine still reach through the windows and will perpetuate premature aging and hyperpigmentation. Even if you're working in an office all day long, you're not supposed to skip sunscreen. This is particularly important if you're sitting by a window or driving to work. The same goes for glass windows of any sort whether you’re on an aircraft, bus or any other vehicle.

Despite the way the sky looks, you can still be affected by the sun’s harmful UV rays, No matter how dense the clouds appear in this weather, up to 80% of the sun's rays can easily filter through them

UVA rays are powerful all year round, so your skin needs protection every day of the year. Even a small dose of sunlight can have a damaging effect on your skin.

Winter is the season where you should want to work harder to prevent dry skin and wrinkles, so put on that sunscreen, and use it to keep your skin radiant. This weather is extremely dry and taxing on the skin. Luckily, sunscreen has proven anti-ageing properties.

You're likely to sweat off your sunscreen on a humid day at the beach and need to reapply. What most people don't know, though, is that the harsh winter temperatures make the sunscreen erode much faster. UV radiation rises by 5% per 1,000 feet above sea level. This means that the higher your altitude, the greater your vulnerability to harmful UV rays. Plus, the snow reflects and intensifies the sunlight, rendering you especially susceptible to burns. If you're looking to spend time in the mountains skiing, snowboarding, or cabin-dwelling this season, make sure to always cover yourself with at least 30 SPF of sunscreen.

Snow and strong winds strip away sunscreen and reduce its effectiveness, so in winter, you can't just apply in the morning and say that you're safe all day. Instead, it is recommended that you reapply every two hours during the winter, and immediately after sweating.

Traditionally, most people often believe that they only need sunscreen to shield themselves from sunburn, so we sometimes equate it with visits to the beach or being by the pool, but it's time to shift this narrative and realize that sunscreen is not only about protecting from those days spent in the sun, but even these regular moments can add up to a lifetime of sun damage.

Sun Protection Factor

Sunscreens are labeled with either SPF or Sun Protection Factor. The SPF functions like a multiplier. If you feel that you do ok in the sun for 10 minutes without getting a sun burn for example if you apply a SPF 10 sunscreen, you'll be protected from the sun for 100 minutes. However, in order for the sunscreen to work, you have to apply a lot and it has to stay on. You should use it about half an hour before you head out in the sun (or water) so that it can stick to your skin.

Damage done by the sun to your skin cells lasts forever. Yeah, lasers can remove superficial damage, but the damage to your DNA cannot be reversed. There's a reason why numerous makeup items contain SPF—it’s essential to wear them all year round.

Moisturizers, BB creams, concealers and foundations now all come with SPF-containing varieties that will make this healthy habit simpler. Since wearing sunscreen will deter the ageing process by almost 24 per cent, it's a smart idea to get this ingredient as abundant as possible in your skincare and makeup routines.

However, if the UV rays do end up making their way to you, hydration is one of the best cures for sunburn swelling. As any burn, sunburn causes a loss of moisture in the infected tissue which can require a few water or moisturizer applications to return the skin to its natural state. Creams or aloe vera gels can help to moisturize the skin and minimize swelling. You should also soak a few cotton balls in witch hazel and softly rub them over your skin to cool it off. Try putting cold, wet tea bags on top of the burn to remove the sting of the sunburn. Be vigilant not to burst any blisters, if you feel serious discomfort and swelling, seek medical attention.

SPF’s should never be an option, but a priority to be worn daily for all skin types. Especially, in the winter to scale back those risks, it’s vital to apply (and reapply) sunscreen as part of your daily skin-care routine.

It’s better to be safe than sorry.

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