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Cold Brew VS Dutch Brew

Cold Brew VS Dutch Brew

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Asked  5 months ago
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As interest in cold and ready-to-drink coffee increases one is certain to run into two powerhouses of the cold coffee world; cold brew and Dutch brew. 

But for many, especially someone like me who is newer to the chilled coffee scene there may be some confusion about these two types of coffee. Like for example, what are the differences between the two, or are they the same thing? I can't find a decent answer online.

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What exactly are cold and Dutch brew?

 Cold and Dutch brew are both methods of preparing coffee using cold water and time rather than hot water. The origins of both go back to Dutch sailors during the Age of Exploration in the 16-1800’s. The Dutch sailors wanted a method of preparing and storing coffee for long voyages at sea where hot coffee would be difficult to prepare and easy to spoil. 

So they developed a way to brew their coffee with cold water instead. This method also allowed the sailors to store their coffee for weeks at a time without it spoiling. The art of cold brewing was introduced to Tokugawa Japan and Joseon Korea. This is significant because both nations were in a state of semi-isolationism. We say "semi" because they still traded with some select Asian nations and the sole European nation of the Netherlands. 

The art of cold brewing went dormant in the Netherlands for a while, but in Japan, the method was preserved and perfected. Today we have the Dutch and cold brewing methods which both use cold or room temperature water and long periods of time to prepare coffee. 

The use of cold water rather than hot results in a texture that is a bit thicker and silkier, and a flavor that lacks any bitterness. Cold and Dutch brewed coffee can also be kept for up to a week or more if properly refrigerated. 

Are cold brew and Dutch brew the same thing?

In short; no. But the differences may appear quite subtle. Let us look more closely at each one to learn more.

Cold-brew coffee

This variety of coffee is prepared by immersing coffee beans in cold or room temperature water. The immersed coffee mixture is then left to further immerse for a period of 12 to 24 hours, or until a brewer is ready to take their mixture out! 

Once the mixture is ready, the grounds are strained and the resulting concentrate can be enjoyed as is or decanted. Any remaining coffee can then be stored and enjoyed throughout a week or two-week duration before it may begin spoiling. 

The flavor is a bit thicker and richer in flavor, color, and texture compared to Dutch brew. Cold-brew, though an offshoot of Dutch brew, is often credited as having its roots in Japan as early as the 1600s, and in particular in Kyoto’s coffee house scene.

Dutch brew coffee

This style is the parent method of cold brew but has some differences in its overall taste profile and its brewing method. While cold brew uses an immersion method, Dutch brew uses a similar principle that pour-over coffee uses but executed in a far different way. 

Dutch brew is often prepared in a very elaborate set of beakers, cups, and tubes made of glass and held in a distinct wooden vertical shelf. Grounds are held in one glass chamber while water or even ice is dripped down onto the grounds and run through the series of tubes into a reservoir at the base of the whole contraption. The whole operation resembles a science experiment and it is true there is a bit of science to the whole thing because valves controlling pressure can be toggled to control how much water is dripped and how quickly it is dripped, too. Its antiquated origins are, as its name suggests, found in the Netherlands going back to the 1600s, and like cold brew, it too can be decanted and enjoyed throughout the week. 

As for appearance and taste compared to cold brew, Dutch brew is oftentimes a bit lighter in color, taste, texture, and aroma. Think of cold brew as dark chocolate and Dutch brew as more of milk chocolate if that helps!

What are the differences between cold brew and Dutch brew?

        The main differences lie in how these two are brewed, and their overall flavor, aroma, and texture palettes. They are similar because cold brew is an offshoot of Dutch brew, and they are both cold variations of coffee. But ultimately they are different modes of coffee. The best way to find out how different would be to sample these two excellent varieties of coffee yourself! 

Sources:

  • “Cold Brew Coffee vs Dutch Coffee.” Dutch Coffee, www.dutch-coffee.nl/dutch-coffee-vs-cold-brew-coffee-2/.
  • “The History of Cold Brew.” Driftaway Coffee, 18 June 2019, driftaway.coffee/the-history-of-cold-brew/.
  • Taste.com.au. “Cold Brew vs Cold Drip Coffee: What's the Difference?” Www.taste.com.au, Taste, 9 Aug. 2018, www.taste.com.au/articles/cold-brew-vs-cold-drip-coffee-whats-difference/dkuzovzo.
  • “What Is Dutch Coffee?” Cold Brew Queen, 4 Aug. 2020, coldbrewqueen.com/what-is-dutch-coffee/. 

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Cold Brew VS Dutch Brew

Cold Brew VS Dutch Brew

bounty icon
$20
Single winner
Asked  5 months ago
Viewed  0 times

As interest in cold and ready-to-drink coffee increases one is certain to run into two powerhouses of the cold coffee world; cold brew and Dutch brew. 

But for many, especially someone like me who is newer to the chilled coffee scene there may be some confusion about these two types of coffee. Like for example, what are the differences between the two, or are they the same thing? I can't find a decent answer online.

  • add comment
avatar

What exactly are cold and Dutch brew?

 Cold and Dutch brew are both methods of preparing coffee using cold water and time rather than hot water. The origins of both go back to Dutch sailors during the Age of Exploration in the 16-1800’s. The Dutch sailors wanted a method of preparing and storing coffee for long voyages at sea where hot coffee would be difficult to prepare and easy to spoil. 

So they developed a way to brew their coffee with cold water instead. This method also allowed the sailors to store their coffee for weeks at a time without it spoiling. The art of cold brewing was introduced to Tokugawa Japan and Joseon Korea. This is significant because both nations were in a state of semi-isolationism. We say "semi" because they still traded with some select Asian nations and the sole European nation of the Netherlands. 

The art of cold brewing went dormant in the Netherlands for a while, but in Japan, the method was preserved and perfected. Today we have the Dutch and cold brewing methods which both use cold or room temperature water and long periods of time to prepare coffee. 

The use of cold water rather than hot results in a texture that is a bit thicker and silkier, and a flavor that lacks any bitterness. Cold and Dutch brewed coffee can also be kept for up to a week or more if properly refrigerated. 

Are cold brew and Dutch brew the same thing?

In short; no. But the differences may appear quite subtle. Let us look more closely at each one to learn more.

Cold-brew coffee

This variety of coffee is prepared by immersing coffee beans in cold or room temperature water. The immersed coffee mixture is then left to further immerse for a period of 12 to 24 hours, or until a brewer is ready to take their mixture out! 

Once the mixture is ready, the grounds are strained and the resulting concentrate can be enjoyed as is or decanted. Any remaining coffee can then be stored and enjoyed throughout a week or two-week duration before it may begin spoiling. 

The flavor is a bit thicker and richer in flavor, color, and texture compared to Dutch brew. Cold-brew, though an offshoot of Dutch brew, is often credited as having its roots in Japan as early as the 1600s, and in particular in Kyoto’s coffee house scene.

Dutch brew coffee

This style is the parent method of cold brew but has some differences in its overall taste profile and its brewing method. While cold brew uses an immersion method, Dutch brew uses a similar principle that pour-over coffee uses but executed in a far different way. 

Dutch brew is often prepared in a very elaborate set of beakers, cups, and tubes made of glass and held in a distinct wooden vertical shelf. Grounds are held in one glass chamber while water or even ice is dripped down onto the grounds and run through the series of tubes into a reservoir at the base of the whole contraption. The whole operation resembles a science experiment and it is true there is a bit of science to the whole thing because valves controlling pressure can be toggled to control how much water is dripped and how quickly it is dripped, too. Its antiquated origins are, as its name suggests, found in the Netherlands going back to the 1600s, and like cold brew, it too can be decanted and enjoyed throughout the week. 

As for appearance and taste compared to cold brew, Dutch brew is oftentimes a bit lighter in color, taste, texture, and aroma. Think of cold brew as dark chocolate and Dutch brew as more of milk chocolate if that helps!

What are the differences between cold brew and Dutch brew?

        The main differences lie in how these two are brewed, and their overall flavor, aroma, and texture palettes. They are similar because cold brew is an offshoot of Dutch brew, and they are both cold variations of coffee. But ultimately they are different modes of coffee. The best way to find out how different would be to sample these two excellent varieties of coffee yourself! 

Sources:

  • “Cold Brew Coffee vs Dutch Coffee.” Dutch Coffee, www.dutch-coffee.nl/dutch-coffee-vs-cold-brew-coffee-2/.
  • “The History of Cold Brew.” Driftaway Coffee, 18 June 2019, driftaway.coffee/the-history-of-cold-brew/.
  • Taste.com.au. “Cold Brew vs Cold Drip Coffee: What's the Difference?” Www.taste.com.au, Taste, 9 Aug. 2018, www.taste.com.au/articles/cold-brew-vs-cold-drip-coffee-whats-difference/dkuzovzo.
  • “What Is Dutch Coffee?” Cold Brew Queen, 4 Aug. 2020, coldbrewqueen.com/what-is-dutch-coffee/. 

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