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What Snowboard Boots Should I Buy?

What Snowboard Boots Should I Buy?

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$50
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Asked  5 months ago
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I'm having a long holiday due to covid, I wanna spend it all in the moutains, I'm a newbee who know nothing about skiing,but I have enough budget. I have looked through tons of snowboard boots review but still confusing of how to pick the best snowboard boots for my first try, any practical suggestion would be helpful.

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Which snowboard boots you buy will make a massive difference to your riding and your enjoyment. They must fit properly, but they should also suit your ability and riding style. Before you start looking at what snowboard boots to buy, you need to understand some associated terminology.

Shell - This is the outer part of the snowboard boot. It plays a big role in the boot’s stiffness and is what the liner fits into.

Liner - The liner is the softer part that you slide your foot into. Liners are made from a lightweight foam that can be molded to your foot. The liner keeps your foot warm, dampens vibrations, and gives you stability.

Toe Box - Simply put, the toe box is the area of the boot where your toes sit.

Articulated cuff - This part of the boot allows the boot's upper and lower parts to move independently. The articulated cuff usually consists of grooves or cutouts to allow movement.

Backstay - The backstay is a strip of material placed on the back of the boot. This is usually made from rubber and grips your binding when riding.

Footbed - This is the inner sole of your snowboard boot. These can be molded to sit your foot or replaced with more suitable ones. A good boot fitter will be able to help you out with the correct footbed for you.

Sole -The sole is the outer part of the boot in contact with the ground or the base of your bindings. Look for snowboard boots with grippy soles, such as Vibram, as you will find walking around on the snow much easier.

Flex - The flex rating of a snowboard boot indicates how stiff or soft it is. Your choice of flex is down to personal preference. But beginners usually use softer boots as they are more forgiving. However, stiffer boots give you more control. Manufacturers rate their flex differently, so it is worth doing your homework to ensure you get boots with the right flex for you.

Different Kinds Of Snowboard Boots

You can choose snowboard boots that suit different styles of riding. Before buying a pair of snowboard boots, you need to think about the kind of riding you do or want to do.

Freeride boots - Freeriding is when snowboarders take on the backcountry. Freeriders look for steep terrain and deep snow, often dropping cliffs. This type of riding requires control; therefore, free ride boots are generally quite stiff. These boots are not great for beginners, but they might suit heavier riders, thanks to their extra support.

Freestyle boots - Freestyle snowboarders spend all their time in the park or jibbing around the mountain. They need forgiving snowboard boots; therefore, freestyle boots are pretty soft. Freestyle boots are suitable for beginners and lighter riders, as they are forgiving.

All-mountain boots - All-mountain snowboard boots give you a medium level of support, making them great for riders who want to ride anywhere. They make it easy to ride any kind of terrain and are suitable for all riding types; all-mountain boots are the most popular. Inexperienced snowboarders will benefit from using all-mountain boots, as they will help them to progress. But, all-mountain snowboard boots are also used by experienced riders, as they hit the sweet spot in terms of stiffness.

Getting The Right Fit

When you try on a pair of snowboard boots, they should feel snug but not painful. They will start to loosen up after a few rides. Your big toe should be just touching the end of the boot, but you should be able to wiggle your toes. Your heel should also not lift at all; if you have the slightest heel lift, they are the wrong boots for you. There is a delicate balance between having a boot that is too tight and one with heel lift.

The idea is to buy snowboard boots that will fit you perfectly after a few rides, and not in the shop.

You may be tempted to wear thick socks when you try on some new snowboard boots. This is not the best thing to do, as thick socks can insulate you from how the boots feel. They also affect your control and feel. You need to remember that your socks are your first point of contact with your snowboard setup. If you get this wrong, it doesn’t matter how good your boots, bindings, and board are.

Getting The Right Size

Snowboard boot sizes are indicated in the same way as regular shoes. The only differences you will see will be related to what country you are in. Snowboard boot sizes will vary slightly between manufacturers too. Also, some manufacturers will concentrate on people with narrow or wide feet. Therefore, you should try on lots of boots from different manufacturers. This way, you will be able to narrow down your search to a particular brand. There is a good chance you will find a brand that makes the perfect shape boot for your feet, and you will stay with them forever.

Lacing Systems

There are a few options you can choose from concerning how your snowboard boots lace up. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, so it is all down to personal preference. But here is an overview of each type:

BOA - Snowboard boots with a BOA system work by twisting a wheel on the side of the boot. This tightens or loosens them off, and the main advantage of a BOA system is that you can easily fine tune the fit. Often you will find boots with two BOA systems that allow you to adjust the upper and lower parts independently.

Speed lacing system - This system lets you get in and out of your boots quickly. It also gives you a good level of adjustment, even while wearing gloves. Snowboard boots with a speed lacing system will have two different laces allowing you to adjust the upper and lower parts independently, like a BOA.

Traditional laces - Simple and reliable, traditional laces are just like regular shoes. They are easy to use, but they do loosen off throughout the day.

Buying Snowboard Boots

Buying snowboard boots isn’t complicated. But, you need to ensure you buy them based on their fit. Don’t be tempted to by the cool looking ones or the ones your friend wears. They are your feet, and it is your time on the mountain. Visiting a good boot fitter is invaluable when buying a pair of snowboard boots, no matter your riding level.

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What Snowboard Boots Should I Buy?

What Snowboard Boots Should I Buy?

bounty icon
$50
Single winner
Asked  5 months ago
Viewed  0 times

I'm having a long holiday due to covid, I wanna spend it all in the moutains, I'm a newbee who know nothing about skiing,but I have enough budget. I have looked through tons of snowboard boots review but still confusing of how to pick the best snowboard boots for my first try, any practical suggestion would be helpful.

  • add comment
avatar

Which snowboard boots you buy will make a massive difference to your riding and your enjoyment. They must fit properly, but they should also suit your ability and riding style. Before you start looking at what snowboard boots to buy, you need to understand some associated terminology.

Shell - This is the outer part of the snowboard boot. It plays a big role in the boot’s stiffness and is what the liner fits into.

Liner - The liner is the softer part that you slide your foot into. Liners are made from a lightweight foam that can be molded to your foot. The liner keeps your foot warm, dampens vibrations, and gives you stability.

Toe Box - Simply put, the toe box is the area of the boot where your toes sit.

Articulated cuff - This part of the boot allows the boot's upper and lower parts to move independently. The articulated cuff usually consists of grooves or cutouts to allow movement.

Backstay - The backstay is a strip of material placed on the back of the boot. This is usually made from rubber and grips your binding when riding.

Footbed - This is the inner sole of your snowboard boot. These can be molded to sit your foot or replaced with more suitable ones. A good boot fitter will be able to help you out with the correct footbed for you.

Sole -The sole is the outer part of the boot in contact with the ground or the base of your bindings. Look for snowboard boots with grippy soles, such as Vibram, as you will find walking around on the snow much easier.

Flex - The flex rating of a snowboard boot indicates how stiff or soft it is. Your choice of flex is down to personal preference. But beginners usually use softer boots as they are more forgiving. However, stiffer boots give you more control. Manufacturers rate their flex differently, so it is worth doing your homework to ensure you get boots with the right flex for you.

Different Kinds Of Snowboard Boots

You can choose snowboard boots that suit different styles of riding. Before buying a pair of snowboard boots, you need to think about the kind of riding you do or want to do.

Freeride boots - Freeriding is when snowboarders take on the backcountry. Freeriders look for steep terrain and deep snow, often dropping cliffs. This type of riding requires control; therefore, free ride boots are generally quite stiff. These boots are not great for beginners, but they might suit heavier riders, thanks to their extra support.

Freestyle boots - Freestyle snowboarders spend all their time in the park or jibbing around the mountain. They need forgiving snowboard boots; therefore, freestyle boots are pretty soft. Freestyle boots are suitable for beginners and lighter riders, as they are forgiving.

All-mountain boots - All-mountain snowboard boots give you a medium level of support, making them great for riders who want to ride anywhere. They make it easy to ride any kind of terrain and are suitable for all riding types; all-mountain boots are the most popular. Inexperienced snowboarders will benefit from using all-mountain boots, as they will help them to progress. But, all-mountain snowboard boots are also used by experienced riders, as they hit the sweet spot in terms of stiffness.

Getting The Right Fit

When you try on a pair of snowboard boots, they should feel snug but not painful. They will start to loosen up after a few rides. Your big toe should be just touching the end of the boot, but you should be able to wiggle your toes. Your heel should also not lift at all; if you have the slightest heel lift, they are the wrong boots for you. There is a delicate balance between having a boot that is too tight and one with heel lift.

The idea is to buy snowboard boots that will fit you perfectly after a few rides, and not in the shop.

You may be tempted to wear thick socks when you try on some new snowboard boots. This is not the best thing to do, as thick socks can insulate you from how the boots feel. They also affect your control and feel. You need to remember that your socks are your first point of contact with your snowboard setup. If you get this wrong, it doesn’t matter how good your boots, bindings, and board are.

Getting The Right Size

Snowboard boot sizes are indicated in the same way as regular shoes. The only differences you will see will be related to what country you are in. Snowboard boot sizes will vary slightly between manufacturers too. Also, some manufacturers will concentrate on people with narrow or wide feet. Therefore, you should try on lots of boots from different manufacturers. This way, you will be able to narrow down your search to a particular brand. There is a good chance you will find a brand that makes the perfect shape boot for your feet, and you will stay with them forever.

Lacing Systems

There are a few options you can choose from concerning how your snowboard boots lace up. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, so it is all down to personal preference. But here is an overview of each type:

BOA - Snowboard boots with a BOA system work by twisting a wheel on the side of the boot. This tightens or loosens them off, and the main advantage of a BOA system is that you can easily fine tune the fit. Often you will find boots with two BOA systems that allow you to adjust the upper and lower parts independently.

Speed lacing system - This system lets you get in and out of your boots quickly. It also gives you a good level of adjustment, even while wearing gloves. Snowboard boots with a speed lacing system will have two different laces allowing you to adjust the upper and lower parts independently, like a BOA.

Traditional laces - Simple and reliable, traditional laces are just like regular shoes. They are easy to use, but they do loosen off throughout the day.

Buying Snowboard Boots

Buying snowboard boots isn’t complicated. But, you need to ensure you buy them based on their fit. Don’t be tempted to by the cool looking ones or the ones your friend wears. They are your feet, and it is your time on the mountain. Visiting a good boot fitter is invaluable when buying a pair of snowboard boots, no matter your riding level.

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